Group of people sitting at a table listening to one person speak

The Difference, Power, and Discrimination program and its partners host several workshops and lectures of varying length on a variety of DPD topics throughout each academic year. 

 Previous events

DPD standard lunch hour banner text with background
Event title  Supporting Muslim Students in the Classroom
Description

Bring your lunch and join us for an informal conversation on Supporting Muslim Students in the Classroom. No RSVP is required.

To set the stage for our conversation, you’re encouraged to read "Do Muslim Women Really Need Saving?"

Time/Date 12 to 1:30 p.m. Friday, May 6
Location Willamette West Seminar Room, Valley Library

 

DPD standard lunch hour banner text with background
Event title Supporting First-Generation College Students
Description

Bring your lunch and join us for an informal conversation on Supporting First-Generation College Students. No RSVP is required.

To set the stage for the discussion, you’re encouraged to read/view the following materials ahead of time:

Time/Date 12 to 1:30 p.m. Friday, March 18
Location Memorial Union Room 208

 

DPD standard lunch hour banner text with background Event title Teaching DPD Courses Online
Description

Bring your lunch and join us for a presentation and discussion on teaching DPD Courses online. Facilitators: Amber Moody and Kristen Andersen. No RSVP is required.

To set the stage for the discussion, you’re encouraged to read the following article ahead of time: Don't Hate Me Because I'm Virtual

Time/Date 12 to 2 p.m. Friday, Feb. 26
Location Memorial Union Room 208

 

Image of poster for Rosemarie Garland Thomson event Event title A Habitable World
Speaker Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, Professor of English and Co-Director of the Disability Studies Initiative, Emory University
Description

This presentation explicates Harriet McBryde Johnson’s now canonical 2003 New York Times Magazine article, “Unspeakable Conversations: The Case for My Life” as a bioethical case study by applying narrative ethics, literary criticism, and rhetorical analysis. As a bioethical case study, Johnson’s narrative of the “case for my life” makes a strong claim for conserving disability, for what might be called—to follow Deaf studies—disability gain. Throughout this talk, Garland-Thomson develops a framework for understanding and advancing disability bioethics.

Dr. Garland-Thomson’s fields of study are disability studies, American literature and culture, bioethics, and women’s studies. Her work develops the field of critical disability studies in the health humanities, broadly understood, to bring forward disability access, equity, and identity to communities inside and outside of the academy. She is the author of Staring: How We Look and several other books. Her current book project is Habitable Worlds: Disability, Technology, and Eugenics.

Date February 4, 2016

 

DPD standard lunch hour banner text with background

Event title

DPD Lunch: Teaching about Race, Place, and Violence in the United States

Description Bring your lunch and join us for the final informal monthly conversation of the term focused on teaching DPD courses and content.
Readings

Syllabi Examples:

Date December 11, 2015

 

DPD standard lunch hour banner text with background

Event title

DPD Lunch: Exploring Experiential Learning

Description This session was held in collaboration with the AAC&U Centennial Dialogue on Inclusive Excellence.
Readings
Date November 20, 2015

 

DPD standard lunch hour banner text with background

Event title

DPD Lunch: The Trigger Warning Debate: What is at Stake?

Description Bring your lunch and join us for the first of three informal monthly conversations focused on teaching DPD courses and content.
Readings
Date October 23, 2015

 

andrea smith event poster

Event title

Teaching Race, Gender, and Sexuality: Addressing Student Resistance

Speaker

Andrea Smith, Associate Professor, Media & Cultural Studies, University of California, Riverside

Description

When professors attempt to teach content that focuses on race, gender, sexuality and other themes that can be politically fraught, they often meet great resistance in the classroom. They are accused of, among other things, engaging in political indoctrination and being “reverse racists.” This workshop will focus on how we can teach content related to these issues while constructively addressing student resistance. Through an exploration of a variety of pedagogical strategies, we will explore how our teaching methods can more closely proximate our teaching content and incur less student resistance as a result.

Date

April 3, 2015

 

 

paul gorski event poster

Event title

Class in the Classroom: Creating Equitable Learning Environments for Low-Income Students

Speaker

Paul Gorski, Associate Professor, New Century College, George Mason University

Description

In this workshop we will discuss principles and practices for creating equitable learning environments for low-income college students. We will consider curricular, pedagogical, and other dimensions of teaching and learning as well as strategies for teaching about poverty and class issues effectively.

Date

March 5, 2015

 

adela licona event poster

Event title

Teaching at a Land Grant University: A Commitment to Local Knowledges

Speaker

Adela C. Licona, Associate Professor and Director, Rhetoric, Composition, and the Teaching of English Program, University of Arizona

Description

This presentation addresses the establishment and the expressed mission and mandates of public universities in the United States through the granting of federal lands in order to more deeply consider their (missed) democratic potentials. We will explore how classrooms in public universities can be spaces to interrogate the productive forces of normative histories and also dehumanizing rhetorics and, together, consider how to insert such narratives into our critical inquiries, curricula, and classroom discussions. In an attempt to animate the practice of “critical localism,” the presentation will draw from works relevant to Oregon’s environmental and human history, that integrate science and the humanities to consider how such works might invite multiple knowledges into a number of classes from those in environmental and social sciences to those teaching rhetoric, poetry, and writing.

Date

Dec. 3, 2014